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Property News

Lock in your security measures

March 01, 2012

 

Adequate security measures not only ensure your own safety but also the safety of your possessions.

In tenanted properties, the level of security can vary, with the landlord obliged to provide and maintain locks or other security devices so the premises are ‘reasonably secure’. 
 
Neither the tenant nor the landlord can alter or remove the locks and security without the permission of the other party.
 
While many people believe that deadlocks and window security locks are a necessity, they may not be the responsibility of the landlord. The level of security that the landlord is required to uphold depends on a number of things, including the age, location and nature of the premises, the number of break-ins in the neighbourhood and whether previous safeguards were shown to be inadequate.
 
Location will have a large bearing on the type and standard of locks needed to make the property ‘reasonably secure’. If located in a high-risk area, tighter security may be essential.
 
The position of the residence will also influence the intensity of security. For instance, the level of security required for a ground floor unit will usually be higher than that of an elevated apartment as a thief can more easily gain access through doors and windows. 
 
In many cases, insurance companies will insist on installing certain conditions for providing household contents insurance. This can include a double cylinder deadlock for doors leading outside and key locks on all windows. 
 
Tenants should be aware that the requirements of some insurance companies may fall beyond what is regarded as ‘reasonable security’ and therefore the responsibility of a landlord. It is important to clarify such matters before choosing a policy.
 
If you do wish to add additional security devices to make the premises beyond ‘reasonably secure’- for insurance circumstances or otherwise - you must obtain the landlord’s prior consent and pay all the costs.
 
However, if you discover that your neighbourhood has a high level of break-ins and believe the premise is not ‘reasonably secure’, notify your Property Investment Manager immediately. This should be done in writing explaining your situation and how the landlord can better enhance the security of the property.

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